A look into Nepalese Football in the UK

Top left to bottom right - Pritam Thapa, Ichchha Gurung, Sunnivh Subba, Urgen Lama, Ajay Thapa, Milan Rai, Zac Rai, Sudip Thapa, Amir Thapa, Zika Pazi, Suyen Limbu
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Top left to bottom right - Pritam Thapa, Ichchha Gurung, Sunnivh Subba, Urgen Lama, Ajay Thapa, Milan Rai, Zac Rai, Sudip Thapa, Amir Thapa, Zika Pazi, Suyen Limbu
Top left to bottom right: Pritam Thapa, Ichchha Gurung, Sunnivh Subba, Urgen Lama, Ajay Thapa, Milan Rai, Zac Rai, Sudip Thapa, Amir Thapa, Deoman Gurung, Suyen Limbu Photo: Nepalese FC

Nepalese samosa, dumplings, traditional dancing on stage and cash prize for the winning team, you don’t have to travel all the way to Kathmandu to take part in Nepalese football tournaments as they happen in England, throughout the year.

Milan Rai, 23, who plays for J.D Boys Nepalese football club, located in South Harrow is a regular participant in Nepalese football competitions. He revealed the benefits and set backs of carrying out these events, “Football is very popular among guys from my country, so the organisers are aware of the success the events will have. It also brings us together”.

With 95% of participants originating from Nepal, the issue of these events resulting to separation and modern day segregation has been a hot topic.

The J.D Boys F.C defender defended the organisers, explaining how the events don’t cause separation but are there to offer a different form of challenge for footballers. “I played for both my University and local Nepali football teams. The pace of the game is noticeably higher in Nepalese football, its practically non stop, so it gives you something different”. With majority of the games being seven aside with smaller pitches, players have to cover less ground so games are played at a more rapid pace. The 23 year old later added, “Imagine going for a kick about with your friends in the summer, but this time its an actual competition, over 20 teams with trophies and money to be won”.

Co-ordinator of the Yalamberhang Football Cup and ex Ghurkha, Nar Thamsuhang explained how the motives of the events were misunderstood; “We went with the intention of gathering and providing fun for the people of our country, who are a minority in this country.” The 45 year old who has now re-joined service in the British Army added, “The competitions are very active during the summer and we welcome players from all nationalities but it still remains highly popular with Nepalese participants”.

Throughout the years, Nepalese football tournaments have developed significantly. What use to attract a few teams of young men, now includes the Veteran and Super veteran section for older participants. In rare occasions teams from Hong Kong and even professional footballers from Nepal such as Anil Gurung who plays for Manang Marshyangdi Club took part in these competitions to help attract more attendance. However, the biggest improvement has been the involvement of females. Mr Thamsuhang explained, “Due to the growth of the tournaments we must take more responsibilities to ensure further misinterpretation won’t take place, so we try to involve people of all race, size and gender”.

3 Comments on A look into Nepalese Football in the UK

  1. You have exaggerated the tournament to be of such high standard that comparison to National level football has been the latter. Remind you, they are just few bunch of local lads who either want to show off their skills to the girls that come all the way thinking its a fashion show, or to simply meet friends and smoke some dope. And mind you, football club is different from any other business entity. The stakeholders, in this case are the fans. The fans’ investment is their support, while their return comes in the form of the emotional gratification all football fans desire, be it through chasing promotion, surviving relegation or a cup run. Well i assume they do not have fans that cheer for them, apart from few loyal friends and families of friends. They do not own a stadium, no sponsors, are not part of a league, why on earth is the term “club” used instead of “team”. I have got no objections or hate for j.b lads but come on, when one writes an article, one should not write bollocks. Who likes to read bollocks on blogs? These lads playing in the cup comepition whatever you call it are just teams. Not clubs for Vishnu’s sake. Get your facts before you decide to write an article. Nobody likes to read articles based on lies and deciet. Nevertheless, you have done your best but I would reckon you to read more of the “Oxford” dictionary to widen your knowledge on your grammer. Cheers.

  2. You have exaggerated the tournament to be of such high standard that comparison to National level football has been the latter. Remind you, they are just few bunch of local lads who either want to show off their skills to the girls that come all the way thinking its a fashion show, or to simply meet friends and smoke some dope. A d mind you, football club is different from any other business entity. The stakeholders, in this case are the fans. The fans’ investment is their support, while their return comes in the form of the emotional gratification all football fans desire, be it through chasing promotion, surviving relegation or a cup run. These lads playing in the cup comepition whatever you call it are just teams. Not clubs for Vishnu’s sake. Get your facts before you decide to write an article. Nobody likes to read articles based on lies and deciet. Nevertheless, youve done your best but I would reckon you to read more of the “Oxford” dictionary to widen your knowledge on your grammer. Cheers.

    • Please be advised the word is “deceit” not “deciet” and “grammar” not “grammar”. Thank you for your comment.

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